Morgan Smith is represented by Rayfield Allied worldwide.

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Morgan Smith

Baritone

  • The poignancy of his acting, the agony in his big voice, had the audience riveted as he brought to life Scheer’s beautiful lyrics drawn from Lewin’s diary with Heggie’s music.
    Philippa Kiraly, The Sun Break
  • The real star of the cast was baritone Morgan Smith, whose Starbuck joined vocal splendor, moral authority and deep empathy in a phenomenal combination.
    Joshua Kosman, SFGate
  • The performance, by baritone Morgan Smith...was beyond praise, and the ovation that followed was rewarded with an immediate encore — a rare treat at the premiere of a substantial piece of new music.
    Bernard Jacobson, The Seattle Times
  • The fine baritone, Morgan Smith, impressed as Marcello
    Kyle MacMillan, The Denver Post
  • American baritone Morgan Smith makes a welcome return to the SFO as Starbuck, singing with power and conviction as the crewman who comes to admire his captain despite his alarming personal demons.
    Philip Campbell, The Bay Area Reporter
  • Morgan Smith was simply terrific as the first mate, Starbuck.
    Lawrence A. Johnson, The Classical Review
  • American baritone, Morgan Smith, begins Season 2013-14 with his role and house debut as Adam Brandt Mourning becomes Electra at Florida Grand Opera. He travels to Texas to appear as Tadeusz The Passenger in the US premiere at Houston Grand Opera, while at Dallas Opera, he joins a sterling cast for the role of Fritz Die Tote Stadt.  He remains in Texas to appear as Lt. Audebert Silent Night in Fort Worth Opera’s presentation of Kevin Puts’s highly successful work that was premiered last season.

    Spring finds the artist returning to a Jake Heggie piece that was written with him in mind, For a Look or a Touch, a one-act opera that premiered in Seattle in April, 2011, for baritone, actor, piano quintet, percussion, and 200-strong male voice choir, which he sings with San Francisco’s Gay Men’s Chorus for a return performance in Seattle and a multi-city tour of Europe. A frequent collaborator with the composer, Mr Smith considers the opportunity to collaborate on the world premiere and recording (NAXOS) of this dramatic chamber work among his most rewarding personal and artistic experiences. The artist concludes the season with repeat performances of The Passenger at Lincoln Centre in New York.

    Recent successes include his return to San Francisco Opera for the role of Starbuck in Jake Heggie’s Moby-Dick, a role he inaugurated for the world premiere at Dallas Opera and later sang at San Diego Opera. He returned to Oper Leipzig for the roles of Figaro Il Barbiere di Siviglia, Billy The Rise and Fall of the city of Mahagonny, Papageno Die Zauberflote, Marcello La Boheme and Guglielmo Cosi fan tutte.  Additionally he joined the roster at Glyndebourne Festival as Figaro (cover) Le Nozze di Figaro.

    Morgan Smith made his European debut in the 2009-2010 Season at Berlin Staatsoper as Marcello, and at Oper Leipzig as Rossini’s Figaro, Papageno, Marcello, Leandre The Love for Three Oranges and Whitelaw Savory One Touch of Venus.

    A graduate of Columbia College and Mannes College of Music in New York City, the artist became a member of the Seattle Opera young artist program in 1999 where he remained for two seasons, during which time he made his professional debut as Donald Billy Budd, and where he sang roles such as the title role Don Giovanni, Silvio I Pagliacci, Riccardo I Puritani, and Peter Niles Mourning becomes Electra.

    In the 2008-2009 Season, audiences heard him as Escamillo Carmen at Fort Worth Opera and Morales and Zuniga at Los Angeles Opera. At Portland Opera, he appeared as Dandini La Cenerentola.

    Adept in all kinds of contemporary repertoire, Morgan Smith created the role of Ted Steinert in Thomas Pasatieri’s Frau Margot in the world premiere at Fort Worth Opera and on the recording (Albany Records). He inaugurated the role of “Harry or Larry” in the New York premiere of Elliot Carter’s What Next? at The Miller Theater; he covered Gerald Finley as Robert Oppenheimer in the world premiere of John Adams’ Dr. Atomic, commissioned by San Francisco Opera; he sang the world premiere of Richard Cumming’s Aspects of Hippolytus with Hartford Symphony, and created the title role in the Tony Kushner/Maurice Sendak adaptation of Hans Krasa’s children’s opera, Brundibar (recorded by NAXOS). 

    Other roles in the artist’s repertoire include Don Alvaro Il Viaggio a Reims, Slook La Cambiale di Matrimonio, Top The Tenderland, and Belcore L’elisir d’amore. Roles in preparation include Count Almaviva Le Nozze di Figaro, Joseph DeRocher Dead Man Walking, Malatesta Don Pasquale, title role Billy Budd, Sharpless Madama Butterfly, Wolfram Tannhauser, Zurga Les Pecheurs de Perles, and Rodrigo Don Carlo.

    A regular on the concert stage, Mr Smith recently made his Dallas Symphony debut in Bach’s St. Matthew Passion, and debuted with the San Antonio Symphony for the North American premiere of Vier Präludien und Ernste Gesänge, Detlef Glanert’s orchestral adaptation of the beloved cycle by Brahms. Other concert repertoire includes Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, the Requiems of Brahms, Faure, Mozart and Durufle; the Mass in C Minor of both Mozart and Vaughan Williams, Bach’s B Minor Mass and numerous Cantatas, Weihnacht’s Oratorium, Handel’s Messiah and L’allegro Spirituoso, Haydn’s The Creation and Lord Nelson Mass.

    Conductors who have joined him on the podium include Jaap van Zweden, Patrick Summers, Donald Runnicles, Gerard Schwarz, Eduardo Mueller,  Ulf Schirmer, Sebastian Lang-Lessing, George Manahan, Richard Buckley, Vyekeslav Sutej, Christopher Larkin, Joseph Colaneri, Richard Cummings, Jack Everly, William Lacey, Dean Williamson and Ken Masur.

    Future engagements include the title role Don Giovanni at Austin Lyric Opera, and Marcello at San Diego Opera.

    • The Passenger, Houston Grand Opera - Lincoln Center Festival
      July 2014

      The cast is flawless. The baritone Morgan Smith is the heroic Tadeusz, Marta’s fiancé. For the scene in which they discover that they are both at the camp, and alive, Weinberg provides music of pungent longing and subdued ardor.
      Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
      Smith carried the strength and determination of Tadeusz with confident ease, and the power of his voice expressed the character’s defiance.
      George Grella, New York Classical Review
      The opera was strongly cast. As Marta's fiancé Tadeusz, baritone Morgan Smith shares some of the opera's most heartfelt music with a resonant voice and thoughtful portrayal.
      Richard Sasanow, Broadway World
      Sung ardently by Morgan Smith, Tadeusz comes across as a man of pure integrity.
      Ronni Reich, New Jersey Online
    • Silent Night, Kevin Puts, Fort Worth Opera
      (May 2014)

      Smith nearly brought down the house as French Lieutenant Audebert in his Act I aria before the gorgeous “Sleep” chorus.
      David Weuste, Opera Pulse
    • Die Tote Stadt, Dallas Opera
      March 2014

      Morgan Smith all but steals Act 2 as an actor-friend of Marie.
      Arnold Wayne Jones, Dallas Voice
      The scene also happened to feature some of the best performances of the night, featuring baritone, Morgan Smith, who absolutely stole the show with Pierrot’s Lied in the role of Fritz.
      David Weuste, Opera Pulse
      Morgan Smith's Fritz brough thick tone to the opera's second great aria.
      Scott Cantrell, Opera Magazine
    • The Passenger, Houston Grand Opera
      January 2014

      Morgan Smith, a warm and powerful baritone, likewise stood as a pillar of courage and constancy
      Gregory Barnet, Opera News
      Morgan Smith has apt baritonal and dramatic depth for the bravely defiant Tadeusz
      Scott Cantrell, Dallas News
      The baritone Morgan Smith sang strongly as Marta's fiancé Tadeusz, whose proud defiance of camp authority dooms him to the gas chamber.
      William Albright, Opera Magazine
    • Moby Dick DVD San Francisco Opera live recording
      November 2013

      Starbuck is exceedingly well executed by Morgan Smith. Smith’s altercation with Hunter Morris will leave one breathless.
      Christie Grimstad, ConcertoNet
      Morgan Smith is the sturdy first mate Starbuck, with a baritone to match.
      Scott Cantrell, Dallas News
    • Mourning Becomes Electra, Florida Grand Opera
      November 2013

      Morgan Smith was a vocal standout as the sea captain Adam Brant, with whom Christine (and possibly Lavinia), is in love. Smith’s terrific second-act aria, with ship’s rigging in the background, about giving up the sea and his bewilderment at his predicament was a highlight of the evening.
      David Fleshler, South Florida Classical Review
      Morgan Smith brought a richly textured baritone and some sympathy to Adam.
      Heidi Waleson, The Wall Street Journal
      Especially interesting is Morgan Smith making a rather sympathetic bad guy. His diction is particularly clear and this handsome man makes his love and lust for the older Christine absolutely believable in spite of his other motivations.
      Jeff Haller, Concertonet
      In the male roles, baritone Morgan Smith, as Adam Brant, offered a creamy voice that sounded youthful and passionate, well-suited for this role. In his Too weak to kill the man I hate, which in this production opened Act II, and in You gave the gift of love, the tenor-like qualities of his instrument were most appealing.
      Palm Beach Arts Paper
      Baritone Morgan Smith as Adam Brant has a beautiful voice and was given the opportunity to sing the best aria in the production, "Too weak to kill the man I hate." His voice, coupled with his extreme good looks, made him the perfect lover/villain for the piece.
      Jack Gardner, Edge Boston
    • Moby Dick, San Francisco Opera
      Oct 2012

      Morgan Smith was simply terrific as the first mate, Starbuck. […] Smith brought dramatic authority to the conflicted Christian first mate and sang with a burnished baritone and stern power while also bringing a nostalgic yearning to his moments of homesickness for his wife and family.
      Lawrence A. Johnson, The Classical Review
      American baritone Morgan Smith makes a welcome return to the SFO as Starbuck, singing with power and conviction as the crewman who comes to admire his captain despite his alarming personal demons.
      Philip Campbell, The Bay Area Reporter
      The real star of the cast was baritone Morgan Smith, whose Starbuck joined vocal splendor, moral authority and deep empathy in a phenomenal combination.
      Joshua Kosman, SFGate
      One sets a tender conversation between Greenhorn and Starbuck, the principled first mate, who becomes lost in a reverie, recalling his wife Mary and young son back in Nantucket. Baritone Morgan Smith, as Starbuck, has a strapping voice, sturdy as a mahogany beam, but here he sings with lovely, cooing sweetness.
      Richard Scheinin, Mercury News
    • La Bohème, Opera Colorado
      Sept 2010

      The fine baritone, Morgan Smith, impressed as Marcello.
      Kyle MacMillan, The Denver Post
  • Photos

    • Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
      Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
    • Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
      Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
    • Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
      Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
    • Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
      Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
    • Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
      Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak