Morgan Smith is represented by Rayfield Allied worldwide.

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Morgan Smith

Baritone

  • The poignancy of his acting, the agony in his big voice, had the audience riveted as he brought to life Scheer’s beautiful lyrics drawn from Lewin’s diary with Heggie’s music.
    Philippa Kiraly, The Sun Break
  • The fine baritone, Morgan Smith, impressed as Marcello
    Kyle MacMillan, The Denver Post
  • The real star of the cast was baritone Morgan Smith, whose Starbuck joined vocal splendor, moral authority and deep empathy in a phenomenal combination.
    Joshua Kosman, SFGate
  • The performance, by baritone Morgan Smith...was beyond praise, and the ovation that followed was rewarded with an immediate encore — a rare treat at the premiere of a substantial piece of new music.
    Bernard Jacobson, The Seattle Times
  • American baritone Morgan Smith makes a welcome return to the SFO as Starbuck, singing with power and conviction as the crewman who comes to admire his captain despite his alarming personal demons.
    Philip Campbell, The Bay Area Reporter
  • Morgan Smith was simply terrific as the first mate, Starbuck.
    Lawrence A. Johnson, The Classical Review
  • American baritone, Morgan Smith, begins Season 2014-15 as Escamillo Carmen at Vancouver Opera in Canada, a role he sings again later in the season at Pittsburgh Opera.  He joins Seattle Symphony for Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony and travels to San Diego Opera to sing the role of Marcello La Boheme before returning to San Francisco to join the Gay Men’s Chorus at Davies Hall to revive the role of Manfred in Jake Heggie’s For a Look or a Touch, a role he previously inaugurated for the world premiere of the piece. He sings the title role Don Giovanni at Austin’s Lyric Opera, and joins Music of Remembrance in Seattle for another world-premiere:  this time in the role of Picasso in After Life, a new commission by Tom Cipullo, with performances in Seattle, San Francisco, and Santa Barbara.  At the end of the season, he sings the role of Aaron in Ricky Ian Gordon’s Morning Star at Cincinnati Opera.

    Last season’s highlights include his role and house debut as Adam Brandt Mourning becomes Electra at Florida Grand Opera; Tadeusz The Passenger in the US premiere at Houston Grand Opera and at Lincoln Centre; Fritz Die Tote Stadt at Dallas Opera, and Lt. Audebert Silent Night in Fort Worth Opera’s presentation of Kevin Puts’s highly successful work about the First World War.

    Recent successes include his return to San Francisco Opera for the role of Starbuck in Jake Heggie’s Moby-Dick, a role he inaugurated for the world premiere at Dallas Opera and later sang at San Diego Opera.  He returned to Oper Leipzig for the roles of Figaro Il Barbiere di Siviglia, Billy The Rise and Fall of the city of Mahagonny, Papageno Die Zauberflote, Marcello La Boheme and Guglielmo Cosi fan tutte.  Additionally he joined the roster at Glyndebourne Festival as Figaro (cover) Le Nozze di Figaro.

    Future engagements include Count Le Nozze di Figaro at Seattle Opera.

    • Jake Heggie: Out of Darkness Naxos recording
      November 2014

      The recording captures the 2013 song-cycle version of “For a Look or a Touch”, powerfully sung by baritone Morgan Smith, who also is heard in “Farewell Auschwitz.”
      Melinda Bargreen, The Seattle Times
      Baritone Morgan Smith is vocally polished...
      Gramophone
    • Carmen (Escamillo), Vancouver Opera
      September 2014

      Morgan Smith’s Escamillo (the matador) superbly delivered machismo with every cell of his body, especially the famous “Toreador” song, which he sang like a proud cockerel (also, his spoken French made everyone else by contrast sound like they were speaking Air Canada French).
      Jason Hall, Vancouver Observer
    • The Passenger, Houston Grand Opera - Lincoln Center Festival
      July 2014

      The cast is flawless. The baritone Morgan Smith is the heroic Tadeusz, Marta’s fiancé. For the scene in which they discover that they are both at the camp, and alive, Weinberg provides music of pungent longing and subdued ardor.
      Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times
      Smith carried the strength and determination of Tadeusz with confident ease, and the power of his voice expressed the character’s defiance.
      George Grella, New York Classical Review
      The opera was strongly cast. As Marta's fiancé Tadeusz, baritone Morgan Smith shares some of the opera's most heartfelt music with a resonant voice and thoughtful portrayal.
      Richard Sasanow, Broadway World
      Sung ardently by Morgan Smith, Tadeusz comes across as a man of pure integrity.
      Ronni Reich, New Jersey Online
    • Silent Night, Kevin Puts, Fort Worth Opera
      (May 2014)

      Smith nearly brought down the house as French Lieutenant Audebert in his Act I aria before the gorgeous “Sleep” chorus.
      David Weuste, Opera Pulse
    • Die Tote Stadt, Dallas Opera
      March 2014

      Morgan Smith all but steals Act 2 as an actor-friend of Marie.
      Arnold Wayne Jones, Dallas Voice
      The scene also happened to feature some of the best performances of the night, featuring baritone, Morgan Smith, who absolutely stole the show with Pierrot’s Lied in the role of Fritz.
      David Weuste, Opera Pulse
      Morgan Smith's Fritz brough thick tone to the opera's second great aria.
      Scott Cantrell, Opera Magazine
    • The Passenger, Houston Grand Opera
      January 2014

      Morgan Smith, a warm and powerful baritone, likewise stood as a pillar of courage and constancy
      Gregory Barnet, Opera News
      Morgan Smith has apt baritonal and dramatic depth for the bravely defiant Tadeusz
      Scott Cantrell, Dallas News
      The baritone Morgan Smith sang strongly as Marta's fiancé Tadeusz, whose proud defiance of camp authority dooms him to the gas chamber.
      William Albright, Opera Magazine
    • Moby Dick DVD San Francisco Opera live recording
      November 2013

      Starbuck is exceedingly well executed by Morgan Smith. Smith’s altercation with Hunter Morris will leave one breathless.
      Christie Grimstad, ConcertoNet
      Morgan Smith is the sturdy first mate Starbuck, with a baritone to match.
      Scott Cantrell, Dallas News
    • Mourning Becomes Electra, Florida Grand Opera
      November 2013

      Morgan Smith was a vocal standout as the sea captain Adam Brant, with whom Christine (and possibly Lavinia), is in love. Smith’s terrific second-act aria, with ship’s rigging in the background, about giving up the sea and his bewilderment at his predicament was a highlight of the evening.
      David Fleshler, South Florida Classical Review
      Morgan Smith brought a richly textured baritone and some sympathy to Adam.
      Heidi Waleson, The Wall Street Journal
      Especially interesting is Morgan Smith making a rather sympathetic bad guy. His diction is particularly clear and this handsome man makes his love and lust for the older Christine absolutely believable in spite of his other motivations.
      Jeff Haller, Concertonet
      In the male roles, baritone Morgan Smith, as Adam Brant, offered a creamy voice that sounded youthful and passionate, well-suited for this role. In his Too weak to kill the man I hate, which in this production opened Act II, and in You gave the gift of love, the tenor-like qualities of his instrument were most appealing.
      Palm Beach Arts Paper
      Baritone Morgan Smith as Adam Brant has a beautiful voice and was given the opportunity to sing the best aria in the production, "Too weak to kill the man I hate." His voice, coupled with his extreme good looks, made him the perfect lover/villain for the piece.
      Jack Gardner, Edge Boston
    • Moby Dick, San Francisco Opera
      Oct 2012

      Morgan Smith was simply terrific as the first mate, Starbuck. […] Smith brought dramatic authority to the conflicted Christian first mate and sang with a burnished baritone and stern power while also bringing a nostalgic yearning to his moments of homesickness for his wife and family.
      Lawrence A. Johnson, The Classical Review
      American baritone Morgan Smith makes a welcome return to the SFO as Starbuck, singing with power and conviction as the crewman who comes to admire his captain despite his alarming personal demons.
      Philip Campbell, The Bay Area Reporter
      The real star of the cast was baritone Morgan Smith, whose Starbuck joined vocal splendor, moral authority and deep empathy in a phenomenal combination.
      Joshua Kosman, SFGate
      One sets a tender conversation between Greenhorn and Starbuck, the principled first mate, who becomes lost in a reverie, recalling his wife Mary and young son back in Nantucket. Baritone Morgan Smith, as Starbuck, has a strapping voice, sturdy as a mahogany beam, but here he sings with lovely, cooing sweetness.
      Richard Scheinin, Mercury News
    • La Bohème, Opera Colorado
      Sept 2010

      The fine baritone, Morgan Smith, impressed as Marcello.
      Kyle MacMillan, The Denver Post
  • Photos

    • Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
      Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
    • Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
      Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
    • Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
      Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
    • Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
      Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
    • Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak
      Photographer Credit: Nico Hudak