Phillip Rhodes is represented by Rayfield Allied worldwide.

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Phillip Rhodes

Baritone

  • As Marcello, New Zealand baritone Phillip Rhodes has a nonchalant authority to go with his rock-solid technique.
    Ron Simpson, What's On Stage
  • Phillip Rhodes, appearing for the first time with Opera North, brings a powerful presence to Aeneas, coming into his own with “Yours be the blame, ye gods!”
    Richard Wilcocks, Bachtrack
  • The role of Aeneas settles easily within the range of the young baritone Phillip Rhodes. His dark coloured voice possesses an attractive rugged quality. A pity that Purcell does not give Aeneas more to do.
    Antony Lias, Opera Brittania
  • Phillip Rhodes was a revelation as the Count (Il Trovatore), lots of presence and a big elegant Italianate voice.
    Owen Mortimer, Opera Now
  • The ghastly Scarpia was delivered with aristocratic relish and silky disdain by Phillip Rhodes
    Michael Tanner, The Spectator
  • UK-based baritone, Phillip Rhodes, begins the 2015-16 Season in his home country New Zealand where he appears as Scarpia Tosca in a new production that plays in both Auckland and Wellington; he returns to the UK to join Opera North for Gérard Andrea Chenier (cover) in which he also sings the role of Roucher.  He joins the roster of the Royal Opera House Covent Garden for the role of Enrico (cover) Lucia di Lammermoor under the aegis of a grant provided by the Kiri Te Kanawa Foundation for both runs of the production, and returns to Opera New Zealand at the end of the season to sing his first Pere Germont La Traviata.

    The artist had a big success as Enrico Lucia di Lammermoor with the Auckland Opera Studio last season.  He returned to Opera North (UK) for Marcello La Boheme and joined ENO for the role of Older Man in Tansy Davies’ new commission, Between Worlds directed by Deborah Warner which won him decisive reviews. Other recent highlights include his debut as Count de Luna Il Trovatore at Dorset Festival Opera, and his debut at Opera North as Aeneas Dido and Aeneas where he also covered the roles of Iago Otello and Balstrode Peter Grimes.

    In future seasons, Phillip brings the roles of Mizgir The Snowmaiden and Peter/Father Hansel und Gretel into his repertoire.

    Phillip Rhodes acknowledges with gratitude the ongoing support of the Kiri Te Kanawa Foundation, and the professional guidance of Dame Kiri.

    • Andrea Chénier, Opera North
      March 2016

      in a large cast, there were notable contributions from Phillip Rhodes as Chénier’s friend Roucher.
      Anthony Arblaster, Opera Now March
      Phillip Rhodes is a sonorous Roucher.
      Tom Sutcliffe, Opernwelt March
    • Andrea Chénier, Opera North
      February 2016

      Giordano’s score contains such a Wagnerian range of colour and catchiness that it could have done with even more idiomatic despatch from the maestro. But his care brought every role into solid play – both Phillip Rhodes’s resonant, affectionate Roucher and Daniel Norman’s authoritative Abbé.
      Tom Sutcliffe, The Critic’s Circle, 27 January
    • Tosca, New Zealand Opera
      September 2015

      As Scarpia, Phillip Rhodes has just the right power and charisma to catch the character's unredeemed villainy. Far from the wigged and corpulent old lecher you might have had, decades ago, in a period production, the New Zealand baritone is lean and sexy, a Mafioso wolf prowling for prey in Maunder's post-Mussolini Italy. Rhodes' voice soars above the strong-voiced chorus in Act I's Te Deum, and yet he can be snake-like and subtle, laying out his personal credo of evil.
      William Dart, NZ Herald, 22/9/2015
      It would have been easy for Rhodes’ Scarpia to be overshadowed by all this Wagnerian-scale singing from the romantic leads but he more than held his own through a combination of rich baritonal vocalism and a sense of barely restrained violence. His rather elegant stage deportment matches well with his suavity of tone, making Scarpia legitimately attractive in his dealings with Tosca. This elegance makes his sudden ferocious outbursts of anger, both vocal and physical, all the more shocking – a much more interesting portrayal than your usual venal tyrant. His voice also has enough richness to make himself the centre of the busy Te Deum scene, even with the hefty dose of incense.
      Simon Holden, Bachtrack, 19/9/2015
      As it turned out the most intriguing performance on stage was that of Rhodes as Scarpia. His youthful looks were far removed from the sleazy, brutish character that we often see, presenting rather a virile, masculine villain that in a different situation might have had little difficulty in seducing Tosca. (…) His virile baritone voice was sumptuous in texture, riding the orchestral and choral waves in the ‘Te Deum’ at the end of Act 1, matching Tosca’s outbursts in Act 2 note for note, and dominating every scene he was in as any good Scarpia should.
      Michael Sinclair, The Opera Critic, 19/9/2015
      Phillip Rhodes's performance as Baron Scarpia is excellent, brimming with malice and a thug-like authoritative control. He has a wonderful voice and was an excellent casting choice, able to stand alongside the powerful O'Neill. His portrayal perfectly captures that dark quality of corrupted people in power at the top, who can outwardly keep a calm and almost civilised manner, whilst simultaneously being the most ruthless and inhumane monsters imaginable.
      Sam Jury, Broadway World, 22/9/2015
      Phillip Rhodes' Baron Scarpia is vocally menacing, particularly in the Te Deum.
      Takeshi Ito, Stuff, 18/9/2015
      Rhodes, who has achieved recognition on the international opera stage, is brilliant in the part of the fanatically evil Scarpia, delivering the part with aplomb, in the nastiest possible way.
      Marianne Kelly, Time Live, 18/9/2015
      The romantic, freethinking artist Cavaradossi (Simon O’Neill) and the sleazy, greasy Scarpia (Philip Rhodes) were convincing in their tragic ideals, with the latter’s dark looks perfect for his mafia-infused role.
      Antonina Elliott, National Business Review, 18/9/2015
      Philip Rhodes, as the dark voiced villain Baron Scarpia, is right there with him vocally. The colours and power that he produces, his characterisation and concentration shows a fine operatic performer on the way up.
      Penny Dodd, Theatre Review, 20/9/2015
      As in any tragedy, love must be met with a destructive force. New Zealand’s own Phillip Rhodes takes on the dastardly Baron Scarpia, enforcer of the law with an iron fist and his band of lackeys. Rhodes relishes in the performance, giving life to the conniving Scarpia as he entertainingly plans to ignite Tosca’s jealousy and tear the lovers apart. Supported by the Kiri Te Kanawa Foundation, Rhodes is absolutely one to watch.
      Emma Keesing, Concrete Playground, 18/9/2015
      The villainous Baron Scarpia, played by Phillip Rhodes, embodies the manipulation and strength of this evil man who looks so suave he could’ve stepped out of Goodfellas or The Godfather. He’s a wonderful performer whose voice adds the right level of perilous gravitas the story needs.
      Ingrid Grenar, Keeping up with New Zealand, 19/9/2015
      As the Baron Scarpia, Rhodes, while maybe more elegant than evil, nevertheless has a rich and full baritone voice that gives the character great authority.
      Ewen Coleman, The Dominion Post, 12 October 2015
      While Phillip Rhodes, another New Zealander making his mark on the international scene, injected his portrayal of Scarpia with a wonderful pervading menace.
      Manawatu Standard, 11 October 2015
      As an elegantly dressed Scarpia, Rhodes' rich baritone voice has the menace of a Mafia Don determined to have Tosca. His is a cold passion, which conveys he will have his way and that words are only words.
      Mary Bryan, Wanganui Chronicle, 22 October 2015
    • Sweeney Todd, Victorian Opera
      July 2015

      Phillip Rhodes gave Judge Turpin undeviating polish.
      Paul Selar, Herald Sun
    • Lucia de Lammermoor, Mercury Theatre, Auckland, NZ
      October 2014

      Phillip Rhodes, as Enrico, dealt out testosterone thrust with immaculate bel canto credentials…
      William Dart, New Zealand Herald
      Phillip Rhodes has experience in the role of Lucia's brother, Enrico, and it showed with his complex portrait of the character....Vocally, things were tip-top too as he filled the theatre with his ample baritone, full and rich from the bottom range to his thrilling high notes but with a subtle ear for dynamics.
      Simon Holden, Bachtrack
      Phillip Rhodes, the Maori baritone singing Enrico, has a wonderfully dark voice, clear articulation and impressive stage presence (as audiences in Leeds and at Dorset Opera will know).
      Nicholas Tarling, Opera
    • La Bohème, New Zealand Opera
      July 2014

      Props also go to Rhodes, who radiates a blokey beefcake swagger as the volatile painter...
      Cityscape Christchurch
      Phillip Rhodes (Marcello)...did a splendid job as Rodolfo's cronies, singing strongly and bolstering the realism of the ensemble
      Patrick Shepherd, Christchurch Press
    • La Boheme, Opera North UK
      May, 2014

      …and Phillip Rhodes’s warm-toned Marcello head the rest of a first-class cast.
      Martin Dreyer, The York Press
      …the artist Marcello, played with suitable youthful enthusiasm by Philip Rhodes.
      John Leeman, Seen and Heard International
    • La Boheme, Opera North
      (April 2014)

      As Marcello, New Zealand baritone Phillip Rhodes has a nonchalant authority to go with his rock-solid technique.
      Ron Simpson, Whatsonstage.com
      Phillip Rhodes was a warm-voiced, reliable Marcello.
      Opera Magazine
      Phillip Rhodes plays a virile Marcello.
      Alfred Hickling, The Guardian
    • Dido & Aeneas, Opera North
      (February 2013)

      Phillip Rhodes’s firm baritone just keeps Aeneas from becoming the usual wimp.
      Martin Dreyer, The Press
      The role of Aeneas settles easily within the range of the young New Zealand baritone Phillip Rhodes, dressed in the uniform of a naval commander. His dark coloured voice possesses an attractive rugged quality - an ideal vocal match for Helen Stephen's Dido. A pity that Purcell does not give Aeneas more to do.
      Antony Lias, Opera Brittania
      Phillip Rhodes, appearing for the first time with Opera North, brings a powerful presence to Aeneas, coming into his own with “Yours be the blame, ye gods!
      Richard Wilcocks, Bachtrack
    • Hohepa (Jenny McLeod), NBR New Zealand Opera
      March 2012

      Phillip Rhodes as Hohepa gave a strong performance with an expressive voice
      John Daly-Peoples, The National Business Review
      Hohepa, sung affectingly by Phillip Rhodes, his voice mature and attractive, is a humane figure who understands the good intentions of the settler and seeks to avoid the polarisation of attitudes.
      New Zealand Listener
      Phillip Rhodes illuminated the title role, whether tossing off two children's songs or engaging in a laconic confrontation with Robert Tucker's snooty portrait painter.
      William Dart, NZ Herald
      One of the best things about the work is the way McLeod has injected humor into what might be an unrelievedly grim evening. This is particularly true of Hohepa himself, portrayed with dignity but also a sly sense of fun by the fresh-voiced baritone Phillip Rhodes.
      Mike Silverman, CNS News
      Phillip Rhodes in the title role is strong in every way
      Michael Gilchrist, Theatre Review
      He looked and sounded splendid throughout, and had both powerful and touching moments.
      Peter Mechen, Middle C
    • Carmina Burana, Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra
      October 2011

      Welcoming us to the tavern scene, Rhodes brought the same dramatic acumen that won him the 2007 Lexus Song Quest.
      William Dart, NZHerald
    • Tosca, Dorset Opera
      July 2011

      Swarthy Phillip Rhodes was a bit on the young side for Scarpia but is sure to mature into the role and become a formidable interpreter.
      Simon Thomas, WhatsOnStage
      The ghastly Scarpia was delivered with aristocratic relish and silky disdain by Phillip Rhodes, completing a stylish trio.
      Michael Tanner, The Spectator
    • Turandot, New Zealand Opera
      September 2007

      Phillip Rhodes (Ping), Adrian McEniery (Pang) and Benjamin Fifita Makisi (Pong) are perfectly cast and their ensemble work is hugely watchable. The stand out is Rhodes, whose vocal command and charisma fills the stage and auditorium effortlessly.
      Kate Ward-Smythe, Theatre Review
    • Lexus Song Quest
      May 2007

      In the final of the Song Quest, Rhodes sang the Prologue from Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci as his first operatic number. His second choice was Iago’s spine-tingling Credo from Verdi’s Othello. We heard, and saw, that Rhodes has the valuable ability to enter a part; his whole demeanour changed as he prepared to sing Iago, his face clouded, his body tautened, his voice-colour darkened. In the first half, he sang Finzi’s Come Away Death with sustained lyricism and perfect diction.”
      Rob Bid, New Zealand Listener
    • Lexus Song Quest
      May 2007

      In the final of the Song Quest, Rhodes sang the Prologue from Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci as his first operatic number. His second choice was Iago’s spine-tingling Credo from Verdi’s Othello. We heard, and saw, that Rhodes has the valuable ability to enter a part; his whole demeanour changed as he prepared to sing Iago, his face clouded, his body tautened, his voice-colour darkened. In the first half, he sang Finzi’s Come Away Death with sustained lyricism and perfect diction.”
      Rob Bid, New Zealand Listener
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