Phillip Rhodes is represented by Rayfield Allied worldwide.

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Phillip Rhodes

Baritone

  • Phillip Rhodes, appearing for the first time with Opera North, brings a powerful presence to Aeneas, coming into his own with “Yours be the blame, ye gods!”
    Richard Wilcocks, Bachtrack
  • The ghastly Scarpia was delivered with aristocratic relish and silky disdain by Phillip Rhodes
    Michael Tanner, The Spectator
  • The role of Aeneas settles easily within the range of the young baritone Phillip Rhodes. His dark coloured voice possesses an attractive rugged quality. A pity that Purcell does not give Aeneas more to do.
    Antony Lias, Opera Brittania
  • Phillip Rhodes was a revelation as the Count (Il Trovatore), lots of presence and a big elegant Italianate voice.
    Owen Mortimer, Opera Now
  • As Marcello, New Zealand baritone Phillip Rhodes has a nonchalant authority to go with his rock-solid technique.
    Ron Simpson, What's On Stage
  • London-based baritone, Phillip Rhodes, begins the 2014-15 Season in his home country New Zealand where he makes his debut as Enrico Lucia di Lammermoor with the Auckland Opera Studio, following his recent appearance with Opera New Zealand as Marcello La Boheme, a role he also sang with great success last season at Opera North (UK).  He returns to the UK to cover the role at English National Opera, and remains at ENO for a role in Tansy Davies’ new commission, Between Worlds, to be directed by Deborah Warner; later he appears with his mentor, Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, in recital appearances throughout the season.

    Recent highlights include his debut as Count de Luna Il Trovatore at Dorset Festival Opera, and his debut at Opera North as Aeneas Dido and Aeneas where he also covered the roles of Iago Otello and Balstrode Peter Grimes. In future seasons, Phillip returns to New Zealand for the role of Scarpia Tosca and brings the role of Gerard Andrea Chenier into his repertoire as he covers it for Opera North.

    • La Bohème, New Zealand Opera
      July 2014

      Props also go to Rhodes, who radiates a blokey beefcake swagger as the volatile painter...
      Cityscape Christchurch
    • La Boheme, Opera North
      (April 2014)

      As Marcello, New Zealand baritone Phillip Rhodes has a nonchalant authority to go with his rock-solid technique.
      Ron Simpson, Whatsonstage.com
      Phillip Rhodes was a warm-voiced, reliable Marcello.
      Opera Magazine
      Phillip Rhodes plays a virile Marcello.
      Alfred Hickling, The Guardian
      Phillip Rhodes’s warm-toned Marcello.
      Martin Dreyer, The Press
    • Dido & Aeneas, Opera North
      (February 2013)

      Collins can't resist dropping the slightly heavy-handed hint that Phillip Rhodes's severe-sounding Aeneas may be the same bounder who hangs up on Poulenc's Elle, though in this instance his behaviour is even more reprehensible: he doesn't even ring.
      Alfred Hickling, The Guardian
      Phillip Rhodes’s firm baritone just keeps Aeneas from becoming the usual wimp.
      Martin Dreyer, The Press
      The role of Aeneas settles easily within the range of the young New Zealand baritone Phillip Rhodes, dressed in the uniform of a naval commander. His dark coloured voice possesses an attractive rugged quality - an ideal vocal match for Helen Stephen's Dido. A pity that Purcell does not give Aeneas more to do.
      Antony Lias, Opera Brittania
      Phillip Rhodes, appearing for the first time with Opera North, brings a powerful presence to Aeneas, coming into his own with “Yours be the blame, ye gods!
      Richard Wilcocks, Bachtrack
    • Hohepa (Jenny McLeod), NBR New Zealand Opera
      March 2012

      Phillip Rhodes as Hohepa gave a strong performance with an expressive voice
      John Daly-Peoples, The National Business Review
      Hohepa, sung affectingly by Phillip Rhodes, his voice mature and attractive, is a humane figure who understands the good intentions of the settler and seeks to avoid the polarisation of attitudes.
      New Zealand Listener
      Phillip Rhodes illuminated the title role, whether tossing off two children's songs or engaging in a laconic confrontation with Robert Tucker's snooty portrait painter.
      William Dart, NZ Herald
      One of the best things about the work is the way McLeod has injected humor into what might be an unrelievedly grim evening. This is particularly true of Hohepa himself, portrayed with dignity but also a sly sense of fun by the fresh-voiced baritone Phillip Rhodes.
      Mike Silverman, CNS News
      Phillip Rhodes in the title role is strong in every way
      Michael Gilchrist, Theatre Review
      He looked and sounded splendid throughout, and had both powerful and touching moments.
      Peter Mechen, Middle C
    • Carmina Burana, Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra
      October 2011

      Welcoming us to the tavern scene, Rhodes brought the same dramatic acumen that won him the 2007 Lexus Song Quest.
      William Dart, NZHerald
    • Tosca, Dorset Opera
      July 2011

      Swarthy Phillip Rhodes was a bit on the young side for Scarpia but is sure to mature into the role and become a formidable interpreter.
      Simon Thomas, WhatsOnStage
      The ghastly Scarpia was delivered with aristocratic relish and silky disdain by Phillip Rhodes, completing a stylish trio.
      Michael Tanner, The Spectator
    • Turandot, New Zealand Opera
      September 2007

      Phillip Rhodes (Ping), Adrian McEniery (Pang) and Benjamin Fifita Makisi (Pong) are perfectly cast and their ensemble work is hugely watchable. The stand out is Rhodes, whose vocal command and charisma fills the stage and auditorium effortlessly.
      Kate Ward-Smythe, Theatre Review
    • Lexus Song Quest
      May 2007

      In the final of the Song Quest, Rhodes sang the Prologue from Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci as his first operatic number. His second choice was Iago’s spine-tingling Credo from Verdi’s Othello. We heard, and saw, that Rhodes has the valuable ability to enter a part; his whole demeanour changed as he prepared to sing Iago, his face clouded, his body tautened, his voice-colour darkened. In the first half, he sang Finzi’s Come Away Death with sustained lyricism and perfect diction.”
      Rob Bid, New Zealand Listener
    • Lexus Song Quest
      May 2007

      In the final of the Song Quest, Rhodes sang the Prologue from Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci as his first operatic number. His second choice was Iago’s spine-tingling Credo from Verdi’s Othello. We heard, and saw, that Rhodes has the valuable ability to enter a part; his whole demeanour changed as he prepared to sing Iago, his face clouded, his body tautened, his voice-colour darkened. In the first half, he sang Finzi’s Come Away Death with sustained lyricism and perfect diction.”
      Rob Bid, New Zealand Listener
  • Photos