Daniel Kidane

Composer

"To Daniel Kidane's quietly impressive new Metamorphosis he brought stature, concentration and a beguiling range of sonorities."

Andrew Clark, Financial Times

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Daniel Kidane‘s music has been performed extensively across the UK and abroad as well as being broadcast on BBC Radio 3, described by the Financial Times as ‘quietly impressive’ and by The Times as ‘tautly constructed’ and ’vibrantly imagined’.

Daniel began his musical education at the age of eight when he started playing the violin. He first received composition lessons at the Royal College of Music Junior Department and then went on to study privately in St Petersburg, receiving lessons in composition from Sergey Slonimsky. He completed his undergraduate and postgraduate studies at the RNCM under the tutelage of Gary Carpenter and David Horne. Currently, he is undertaking a doctoral degree at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, supervised by Julian Anderson. 

Current projects include orchestral pieces for the Royal Scottish National Orchestra and CBSO Youth Orchestra, the latter of which is inspired by Grime music. A new chamber work for Cheltenham Festival draws inspiration from Jungle music and a new type of vernacular. Recent commissions for Michala Petri (recorder) and Mahan Esfahani (harpsichord) were released on CD and premiered in the UK at Wigmore Hall. Works for members of the London Symphony Orchestra, which have focused on multiculturalism, and an orchestral work for the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, motivated by the eclectic musical nightlife in Manchester, have received recent critical acclaim.

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Six Etudes

Mahan Esfahani, Recital, Wigmore Hall, London (July 2016)

The Six Etudes of 30-year-old Daniel Kidane brought us right up to the present, offering textures of great finesse and shards of Ligetian playfulness (even adding an intentionally jarring hotel reception bell to the sixth).

Harriet Smith, Financial Times

Sirens

BBC Philharmonic Orchestra , Bridgewater Hall, Manchester (April 2016)

Daniel Kidane's Sirens plunged from sonnets 153 to 154 to a pulsating, foot-tapping Mancunian nocturne, topped off with a quesy morning-after.

Geoff Brown, The Times

…well-attuned to the homoeroticism of Shakespeare’s poems; creating a febrile sense of a heady cruise through Manchester’s gay village. Daniel Kidane’s propulsive, eclectic piece, Sirens, soaked up influences of jungle, dubstep and R&B sampled from a trawl through the city after dark.

Alfred Hickling, The Guardian

Grit, certainly, in a score infused with animal energy and visceral drive, but despite the frenetic ride through that myriad landscape of club scene hommages, it was mapped and navigated with meticulous control; the orchestration, characterised by a transparency of instrumental texture, was handled not just with rhythmic wit but also a searing clarity of purpose.

Pamela Nash, bachtrack.com

Tourbillon, UK-DK, Michala Petri and Mahan Esfahani

OUR 6.220611 (SACD: 66:27) (February 2015)

Kidane, who was born in 1986, has composed an interesting work not based on a whirlwind, as the title might suggest, but on a watch mechanism that bears that same name. In horology, a tourbillon counteracts the effects of gravity on a watch's escapement. Kidane writes, “Both instruments take on the idea of breaking away from gravity but at the same time are restrained by moments of tranquility.” The recorder and the harpsichord are equals in this work, which, while lacking the rhythms of jazz, has something of modern jazz's spontaneity and jaggedness. I'm glad that it was included on this disc because, among all the sweets, it gives listeners something meaty on which to chew.

Raymond Tuttle, Fanfare

Tourbillon, the contribution of the youngest composer on the disc, British shooting star Daniel Kidane, born in 1986, was written for Michala and Mahan’s CD – a work partly disturbingly mono-manic and circling around itself, partly highly virtuosic, but with lyric moments.

Heinz Braun, Klassik Heute

LSO Soundhub Scheme

2014/15

Daniel Kidane’s works are packed with incident and expression, braiding together sounds and entwining groups of instruments to create a meta-instrument that deftly weaves through novel timbres.

London Philharmonic Orchestra

Metamorphosis

Pei-Jee Ng, Royal Northern College of Music

Later that night, your intrepid correspondent braved a recorder quintet in order to hear in the same programme the Australian cellist Pei-Jee Ng premiere Metamorphosis by the Royal Northern College of Music student Daniel Kidane. It proved a splendid piece, in free variation form, and was superbly played. The composer told me that he is a violinist but has not yet written for solo violin. I hope he will. Journeying Songs by David Matthews (also present) uses variation form in a different but equally interesting way. Again Ng played with fine command and control...

Tully Potter, The Strad

With Ng we finally got the real thing - an artist whose age is irrelevant to his musical maturity…To Daniel Kidane's quietly impressive new Metamorphosis he brought stature, concentration and a beguiling range of sonorities.

Andrew Clark, Financial Times

Cellist Pei-Jee Ng's performance of…Daniel Kidane's Metamorphosis [was] strong and expressive.

Anna Picard, The Independent

Flux and Stasis

Fournier Piano Trio, Park Lane Group New Year Concert Series (November 2011)

The fine Fournier Piano Trio introduced the 24-year-old composer Daniel Kidane. They gave the world premiere of his Flux and Stasis, nine compelling minutes of tautly constructed, vibrantly imagined movement and colour, inspired by a mirage that Kidane experienced in Eritrea. No mere piece of impressionistic indulgence, this self-energising music would fire the imagination even without its hidden "programme". It made me keen to hear more both of Kidane and of the Fournier Piano Trio themselves.

Hilary Finch, The Times

Much more of a stretch for them was Flux and Stasis by Daniel Kidane, the result of the young composer's travels in East Africa in 2009 and his experience of and musical reaction to a mirage, an easily explained natural phenomenon and one with just as easily understandable visionary implications. In terms of the music's resources of string harmonics and tremolos, and chordal mightiness for the piano, Kidane has perhaps drunk deep at the Messiaen oasis, but the 10-minute piece did speak of stridently lit mysteries, and did so with rigour and assurance. In short, it worked, and the Fournier players were keenly alive to its glittering soundworld.

Peter Reed, Classical Source

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