Barnaby Rea is represented by Rayfield Allied worldwide.

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Barnaby Rea

Bass

  • Barnaby Rea is an outstanding Bottom, surely a bass going places.
    Neil Fisher, The Times
  • Barnaby Rea’s full-voiced Collatinus is outstanding.
    Richard Morrison, The Times
  • Barnaby Rea’s Second Priest boasts a commanding presence and a rich bass voice.
    Andrew Clark, The Financial Times
  • Barnaby Rea graduated from the Guildhall School of Music and Drama where he studied on the highly acclaimed opera course under the guidance of John Evans.  He was generously supported by the Countess of Munster Musical, the Musicians Benevolent Fund, the Wingate foundation, the Hope Chest, Serena Fenwick, Towergate and the Worshipful Company of Gold & Silver Wyre Drawers.  He has recently completed further studies at the National Opera Studio where he was supported by Scottish Opera and a Sybil Tutton Award administered by the Musicians Benevolent Fund.  Next season Barnaby will enter the ENO Harewood Artist scheme.

    Operatic roles include Collatinus The Rape of Lucretia and Trulove and Madhouse Keeper The Rake’s Progress (British Youth Opera), Il Commendatore and Masetto Don Giovanni (Westminster Opera), and Benoit and Alcindoro in Opera-Up-Close’s Olivier Award-winning production of La bohème.  At the Guildhall School of Music and Drama he has sung Sir John Falstaff Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor, Theseus A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Morales and Zuniga Carmen, King Rene Iolanta, Superintendent Budd Albert Herring, M. Javelinot  and Le Geolier Dialogues des Carmelites, Pietro de Visantis L’Assedio di Calais, Froissart The King Goes Forth to France, Carlino Don Pasquale and Zweiter Geharnischter Die Zauberflöte, as well as excerpts from Mephistopheles Faust, Baron Ochs auf Lerchenau Der Rosenkavalier, Leporello Don Giovanni, Don Basilio Il barbiere di Siviglia, Don Magnifico La Cenerentola, Mustafa Italiana in Algeri, Le Diable Griselidis, Dottore Grenvil La Traviata, Snug A Midsummer Night’s Dream and the title role in Don Pasquale and Le Nozze di Figaro.

    Recent operatic appearances include a much lauded portrayal of Bottom A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Barbican Theatre and Dr. Gibbs in the European premier of Ned Rorem’s Our Town, both for GSMD, Ensemble in English National Opera’s ground-breaking staging of Wolfgang Rihm’s Jakob Lenz and Zaretsky and Captain Eugene Onegin (Opera Holland Park) and Second Priest and Second Armed Man The Magic Flute (English National Opera), Bonze Madam Butterfly and Rocco I Gioielli della Madonna (Opera Holland Park), and Mother Seven Deadly Sins (Scottish Opera). 

    Highlights this season include Masetto Don Giovanni (Scottish Opera), Ceprano Rigoletto and Nourabad The Pearl Fishers (English National Opera) and Colline La Bohème (Opera North).

    • Otello (Ludovico), English National Opera
      London Coliseum (Semptember 2014)

      There was strength in depth in ENO’s casting…Barnaby Rea a dignified, sturdy Lodovico.
      Mark Pullinger, bachtrack.com
    • Don Giovanni (Masetto), Scottish Opera
      Theatre Royal, Glasgow (October 2013)

      Barnaby Rea’s borderline abusive Masetto is neatly sketched in.
      George Hall, The Guardian
      Barnaby Rea’s forceful Masetto projected more character.
      Rupert Christiansen, The Telegraph
      Barnaby Rea’s lusty Masetto is well cast.
      Neil Fisher, The Times
      Barnaby Rea can be forgiven a slightly stiff Masetto thanks to his delightful singing.
      Neil Jones, Opera Now
      Anna Devin as easily seduced peasant Zerlina and Barnaby Rea as her fiance Masetto, add fine voices and strong performances.
      Thom Dibdin, The Stage
      Barnaby Rea’s Masetto was cheerful on the ear.
      Kelvin Holdsworth, Opera Britannia
    • Madam Butterfly (Bonze) / I Gioielli della Madonna (Rocco)
      Opera Holland Park, London (July 2013)

      And it’s clear that the show’s French-Japanese movement-director Namiko Gahier-Ogawa has put everyone on stage through some rigorous training in the language of Japanese theatrical gesture: we feel this most intensely with the characterisation of Cio-Cio San’s family, with Barnaby Rea’s magnificently forbidding Bonze, and with the characterisation of Cio-Cio San herself
      Michael Church, The Independent
      Barnaby Rea's Bonze was something incredible and distinctly memorable for such a small appearance; this is a singer whose career must be watched for his booming voice and clarion tone!
      Fritz Curzon, Musical Criticism
      Barnaby Rea has an impressive bass voice that can fill the marquee...
      Gavin Dixon, Opera Britannia
      ...and there were excellent contributions from...Barnaby Rea.
      Miranda Jackson, Opera Britannia
      Rafaello's leading henchmen were Robert Burt and Barnaby Rea... All were admirable, giving strongly characterised performances and creating a superb ensemble.
      Robert Hugill, Planet Hugill
    • Our Town (Ned Rorem), June 2012
      Guildhall School of Music and Drama

      Barnaby Rea was a fine, sonorous Dr. Gibbs
      Neil Fisher, The Times
    • A Midsummer Night’s Dream, February 2012
      Guildhall School of Music and Drama

      Barnaby Rea is an outstanding Bottom, surely a bass going places.
      Neil Fisher, The Times
      Barnaby Rea was an entertaining Bottom with neat comic timing and a warm bass-baritone. It’s a gift of a role and the audience lapped up his antics.
      Mark Pullinger, Opera Britannia
      Barnaby Rea is splendid as Bottom: his vocal control, musicality and acting ability (including body language in his role as the donkey) are very impressive.
      Agnes Kory, Musical Criticism
  • Photos

    • Photographer credit: Robert Workman
      Photographer credit: Robert Workman
    • Photographer credit: Robert Workman
      Photographer credit: Robert Workman
    • Photographer credit: Robert Workman
      Photographer credit: Robert Workman
    • Photographer credit: Robert Workman
      Photographer credit: Robert Workman